7 Comments

  1. The key thing that is needed for innovative change is a change in perception and our beliefs about what is possible. The only cost is an open mind and the willingness to keep trying. Andt that is priceless!

  2. Introducing innovations in schools is the teaching in real sense, indeed. The schools which are effective are different to schools which are efficient. Effective schools are those where teachers despite of meager resource make a difference while in some schools teachers having much more resource do not make a difference. Thus, innovative teaching and learning strategies make their fame.

  3. Joanne

    I have spent a career (25 years) working in low sociology-economic divisions. As a teacher, I encouraged my students to learn by teaching in a way that made them excited about learning. I made games, they made games, they designed our word wall, and helped make up the dance steps for our Capulet Ball or West Side Story play that we recreated in the cafeteria for the other classes to come see. Most importantly, I made them feel special by letting them know that I took the time to plan lessons that they would enjoy…that was the first hook! I can remember standing at the door greeting them as they entered class each day, and many would ask, ” What are we going to do today”? They didn’t say learn, but they knew that I had taken time to plan a lesson that would require them to think and be actively engaged. Eventually, I got most of them in the habit of looking at the agenda on the board when they entered the class, but a few of the boys wanted me to tell them at the door, so they could go to their seats and tell the others what was going down in class for the day as though they had a secret or special powers by knowing in advance. The same applies today, kids and educators want to know where they are going, why they are doing it, what they are required to do, and how they can accomplish it. This is true whether you are thinking in the box or out of the box…innovation is a mindset that can be cultivated wherever you are.

  4. Joanne

    I have spent a career (25 years) working in low socio-economic divisions. As a teacher, I encouraged my students to learn by teaching in a way that made them excited about learning. I made games, they made games, they designed our word walls, wrote creatively, and helped make up the dance steps for our Capulet Ball or West Side Story play that we recreated in the cafeteria for the other classes to come see. Most importantly, I made them feel special by letting them know that I took the time to plan lessons that they would enjoy…that was the first hook! I can remember standing at the door greeting them as they entered class each day, and many would ask, ” What are we going to do today”? They didn’t say learn, but they knew that I had taken time to plan a lesson that would require them to think and be actively engaged. Eventually, I got most of them in the habit of looking at the agenda on the board when they entered the class, but a few of the boys wanted me to tell them at the door, so they could go to their seats and tell the others what was going down in class for the day as though they had a secret or special powers by knowing in advance. The same applies today, kids and educators want to know where they are going, why they are doing it, what they are required to do, and then, they uniquely discover paths to accomplish it. Having been a principal and currently a division director, innovation is a mindset that can be cultivated whether you are thinking “in” or “out” of the box.

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