4 Comments

  1. Spiri Howard

    Interesting George! What I took away from your post was to be your “smart” self on SM, not necessarily your real self on SM. What we post online is a small glimpse of who we are. I would like to think the individuals following/friending me see a small part of the real me. I know individuals who state their life’s an open book on SM, they have no private accounts, etc. but they don’t allow their followers/friends past Chapter 1 Education. Why state your SM is open, but only share a small part of who you are? Why the contradiction? I’d like to think that’s the beauty of SM, we have the final say; good or bad. It’s a reflection of who we really are, we have good days and bad days, we’ll agree and disagree. But the end result is that this is our true self!

    We often talk about empathy and walking in others shoes, just wondering…why does it not apply to SM? I’m sure I’ve done some…many… 🙂 foolish things as a teen, luckily I couldn’t post it for the world to see. But if I did, I would hope someone would empathize, and assume positive intent. We preach about this all the time to students. Understanding where the person is coming from, but we don’t exercise this in all situations. Why? We’re asking them to try SM, but constantly tell them to only post positive things, potential employers are watching, be careful what you post, it could come back to haunt you and so on. Nothing like instilling fear into their risk taking! And I am guilty of this. My son struggles with tweeting his thoughts because he doesn’t want to offend anyone. I’ve told him if its how he feels, if its a strong feeling, meaningful to him & truthful then tweet it. I don’t want him to just post things he thinks others will like. That’s not acceptable either. And if he did post something that was not well received, then why wouldn’t empathy and positive intent apply to SM? When it comes to SM are we saying, I want my version of you? I want to see you the way I want to see you. And if I don’t see you that way, I won’t interact with you or hire you or whatever the situation may be? I just feel if I am letting this person into my SM world and I am making a conscious effort to get to know him/her…I want to see the real person, not some made up version of what they think I want to see. Thanks once again for enlightening me…and always… keep it real, George.

  2. Erin Scannell

    I agree with you, Spiri, when you say “if I am letting this person into my SM world and I am making a conscious effort to get to know him/her…I want to see the real person, not some made up version of what they think I want to see.” I question whether our children and students view SM in the same way. Look at the number of ‘friends’ many teenagers have on FB; how can one possibly have even met all these people? Twitter amplifies this issue as you don’t accept people as followers, they can just follow you, whether you know them or not. So, in a way, superficiality is encouraged to a certain extent. This generation of young people face so many challenges because of SM as well as so many opportunities.

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