8 Comments

  1. Peggy Visconti

    The notion of being a life long learner certainly strikes a cord with me and yet I cannot get past the feeling of not have anything to say that is worthy of a blog or a book. Is it a self- confidence issue or am I just undecided about what the focus of my learning should be? Did your focus on innovation develop over time? I sincerely want to join the conversation but I struggle with getting started. Any words of wisdom for me?

    • George

      Hey Peggy..I think the best way to start is by what you are doing. Read and comment on blogs is a great way to start feeling comfortable to find that voice. For me, I have actually got to a point where I need to write to let out my thoughts, but at the beginning, is was just trying to share what was happening in my school. I think it is awesome to just share things that you are doing because they definitely will help others. If you have never seen the video, “Obvious to You, Amazing to Others”, it might help you get started 🙂 Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcmI5SSQLmE Thanks for the comment!

  2. Hi George,
    Ironically, I started blogging initially because I “had to” to show evidence of my learning as part of a grant application. But three years later, it has become an integral part of my professional (and sometimes personal) growth. As the title of my blog states, I quite often “write my way into understanding”. In a way, it’s for somewhat selfish reasons… Writing helps me to make sense of things, to reflect, and sometimes as an after thought, share my journey with others. It also provides me a snapshot of my learning over the last three years- I’ve captured “the good, the bad and the ugly.” No book in my future, but I will continue to write from the heart, and to be inspired by others, like yourself, who are doing the same.

    — Sarah

  3. John

    George,

    How do you find time to blog and to write? I’ve enjoyed the quote from Albert Einstein. How did you get your faculty to understand the concept of continuous growth?

    Thanks,

    John

  4. Hi George – wonderful post that really puts down into words, what we who watch you model, already know. If you put your quote about what’s good for the student, it’s a real mandate for non-stop learning on the part of the teacher. Once left in the domain of employers, professional learning has never had the potential of being as personalized as it can be today. May you, or us all, never stop learning.

  5. Hey George.
    Thanks for the mention. The Voxer group book club was the first time I used that tool for that purpose so it was new learning for me too. I appreciate that you tried Voxer and that you were in the space. I know everyone valued your reflections. I remember one instance where you asked everyone what they would challenge in the book–very risky! And yet, completely shows how much you truly model the learning stance, and reinforces the notion that even in the finality of a book, ideas continue to evolve and grow. Thanks for being so visible with your own learning!

  6. Good title, keep learning, and keep education, such blogs helps people to make things different, help them to communicate easily.

Comments are closed.