Tag Archives: twitter

Why We Need The Echo Chamber

 

I read a great post about the “echo chamber” (I encourage you to read the whole thing) from Corrine Campbell, a teacher and Assistant Principal from Sydney, Australia, that shares the importance of disagreement in learning.  There are many great points about how there are so many similar conversations on Twitter (I agree with her on this), that we need to really focus

The beauty of genuinely engaging with someone I don’t agree with, rather than trying to argue against them, is that it stretches me. It forces me to re-examine my beliefs and put them under scrutiny. I may emerge with an even stronger commitment to a particular stance, or I may find my self shifting on issues and adopting a new position. This is healthy, and it is to be encouraged. For me, encountering ideas that force me to re-think my own, is what keeps Twitter a vibrant place of professional dialogue and learning.

Unfortunately, I agree with her :)

I really believe that it is important to value the “naysayer and antagonist“, as opposed to discrediting their thoughts and simply being dismissive.  It is easy to go to extremes, but we should really look for solutions that are closer to the middle.

But in the spirit of Corrine’s post, I decided to pushback (she had lots of comments agreeing with her…OH THE IRONY), and challenge why the echo chamber is sometimes needed.  Here is my comment below (that I might have edited a bit since I wrote it a little too quick on her blog!):

Just for fun…I am going to push back :)

What do we do about the echo chamber in our own schools that sometimes promote the opposite of what many say on Twitter? I think a lot of educators go on to Twitter to share their views because they might actually be in the minority of the “echo chamber” in their own schools.

Personally, that echo chamber helped me a great deal in my work.

Sometimes I would share an idea to my staff and they would think it was not a great direction, yet someone in my network would share the same idea with a different spin or context, and then I would share their post or video with my staff and they would think it was genius. Often, it was basically the same thing that I had said several times. Many suffer from the fear of expertise in their own midst (personally I hate that and try to promote as many people that I work with as experts), and sometimes that echo chamber offers a different voice with the same opinion. What I believe is that even though the ideas might be the same, the delivery is often different. That is needed for different people.  What appeals to me, might not appeal to someone else, and vice versa.

That being said, if we are truly going to be innovative, we need to push back on each other’s ideas. We would be annoyed if our students posted on each other’s blogs and all that they said was “great job!” because they are not pushing conversations or learning from one another. The key, again, is delivery.

There are many educators on Twitter that push back and that is good, but if we don’t listen to each other and just keep yelling our beliefs and seeing who can be the loudest, that is not respectful of learning or each other. Your model of asking questions (seek first to understand) of one another is so crucial. We need to understand viewpoints and context of differing situations. What is brilliant and works for your school, and more importantly, your students, might not be useful to mine, or vice-versa. If anything, we should know now more than ever that there is no standard solution to education; it is more about personalization than standardization. But in every conversation, we need to be open to learning from each other, whether we agree or disagree.

Great post!

My question to you is, is not why the echo chamber is bad, but why it is needed?  Is it something important in our work in our own schools?  I would love your thoughts.

The Balance of Digital Footprint and Having Empathy

You might have heard of “Vodka Samm”.  She was a student at the University of Iowa who was extremely intoxicated, taken to jail, and then live tweeted from her phone about her experience.  Her story quickly went viral, and as we teach our kids about the perils of their “digital footprint”, you can see in the screenshot below the Google search of Samantha Goudie:

Screen Shot 2014-09-03 at 9.35.24 AM

Not the most flattering “footprint”, and by any accounts, she might struggle getting a job if any employer was to Google her.

But before we judge too harshly, check out part of this video that is on the first page of results when you google her name.

Does she seem like a really horrible person or just someone that made a mistake in university?  Does this one action posted online determine her character for the rest of her life?

t is very easy to become judgmental as a society and jump on people when they screw up, but honestly, did you ever drink too much or do something that you regretted?  I know that I am guilty of making many mistakes in my life, and perhaps I was just lucky that social media did not exist when I was in high school or post-secondary.  We teach a lot about “Digital Footprint” but do we teach our kids and ourselves enough about empathy?

I think there has to be a balance of teaching our kids the perils of posting inappropriate things online and the impact it could have on their lives, while also having an empathy for one another and realizing that we are all human meaning fundamentally, we are all flawed.

Our Kids

Last Friday night, I sent out the following tweet:

With many people sharing the tweet, and taking the time to comment on a Friday night (she received 21 comments…not bad for her second blog post!), it really reminded me how much teachers care for kids.  And when I say “kids”, I am not talking about kids in their class, but kids anywhere.  Naomi received comments from all over North America, and even Australia.  Can you imagine what this does for her to help her keep writing and learning, even over the summer months?  Every person that took the time to write, even if it was only for a few seconds, made a difference.  (Side note…I have never shared a blog to #comments4kids hashtag that William Chamberlain hasn’t commented on.  What a great guy for always taking the time to do that.)

Yet when I see how a lot of schools are set up, we seem to be in competition with other schools, districts, and sometimes people in the same building.  Why is that?  When you became a teacher, was it to help kids, or to only help the specific kids you in your class?  I know that with the majority of teachers that I have connected with, any student that is placed in front of them is a kid that teacher will do everything for to help them become better.  What happens when we look at all students as “our kids”?  The imperative share becomes much greater.

So this is why sharing has become so important in our work today.  Every little bit we share with one another, helps a kid somewhere.  Whether it is taken in its exact form, or it is remixed to meet the needs of our class, that “share” does something for kids.  Does it matter if they are across the hall or even across the globe?  I became an educator to help kids. It doesn’t matter where they are from.

Paraphrasing Dean Shareski, it is our moral obligation to share with one another in the field of education.  I believe that the more I go into classrooms and see what teachers do all of the time.  I always think of the “obvious to you, amazing to others” video, and the humble nature of teachers who often think that what they do is not that significant.  You never know the impact of what you share could have on a kid somewhere.  If it makes an impact on one teacher or one kid, somewhere else, isn’t that enough?

We sometimes do not see the impact of our sharing on others, but that is not reason enough to not do it.  I saw the following quote today and it really struck me:

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.” John Quincy Adams

The “sharing” that we do often does all of the things listed above, and if it helps kids, no matter where they are, it is definitely worth it.

P.S. If you want to see a great video on the power of “sharing”, I loved the one below:

A Little Piece of Yourself

The best teachers in the world connect with their students on some personal level.  

I have always believed that.  It does not mean that you share every element of your personal life, but it does mean that you do share parts.  The teachers that impacted me, I remember knowingmore about them than simply what they taught, and it is the reason I became a teacher.  I wanted to make that same impact.

So why do we believe something different when it comes to social media?  Many people are worried about revealing too much about themselves and that will somehow be an invasion of privacy, yet it is always up to the individual on “what” and “how much” they share.  My personal belief and guideline on social media is the following:

“Whatever you can say to a classroom of students is what you can say online.”

If you follow that, you should not only be fine but you can make some pretty powerful connections.

Which brings me to why I am writing this in the first place…

After a presentation that I had made for Peel District School Board in Ontario, I had an educator approach me and tell me that she wanted me to share a story.  As she teared up, I worried about how I might have offended her or said something wrong.  Actually the opposite.

In my tweets, I have shared music I like to the hashtag #georgetunes.  I am a huge music fan, and although I share the occasional One Direction or Wham song (as a joke…maybe not), I am a huge fan of a lot of very mellow music such as William Fitzsimmons, Iron and Wine, and Keane, which has led people to sharing music from bands from The Avett Brothers.  This is something that I would have shared with students so it is not something I was reluctant to share online.

So as this “stranger” shared her story with me, she told me about how someone suggested that she follow me on Twitter.  Although she shared that she appreciated my educational tweets, she really enjoyed a lot of the music that I shared, as we had similar tastes.

And then her mother passed away.

She took a risk, reached out to a stranger (my email is listed on my blog), and shared that she connected with me on Twitter, loved the music I shared, and told me about how her mom had passed.  She then asked me a suggestion for a song.  Of course, I responded immediately, and gave her a suggestion to which she told me that played at her mom’s funeral.  She thanked me for not only responding, but for being willing to share in the first place.

I have not stopped thinking about what she told me and her story.

People have made fun of me for sharing some stuff online (like #georgetunes), but I don’t see myself as an “educator first”, but a person with many sides and interests.  Those connections are what I believed in as an educator, and carry over to what I do online.  I also have been reminded once again that every little thing you share can make a big impact, no matter how insignificant it may seem, so try to focus on the positive.  Who knows what it can do for someone else.

It’s not you Twitter, it’s me.

Yesterday, I read and shared an article from the Atlantic entitled, “A Eulogy for Twitter”.  It talked about the demise of the social network and how something is just not right:

Something is wrong on Twitter. And people are noticing.

Or, at least, the kind of people we hang around with on Twitter are noticing. And it’s maybe not a very important demographic, this very weird and specific kind of user: audience-obsessed, curious, newsy. Twitter’s earnings last quarter, after all, were an improvement on the period before, and it added 14 million new users for a total of 255 million. The thing is: Its users are less active than they once were. Twitter says these changes reflect a more streamlined experience, but we have a different theory: Twitter is entering its twilight.

There already have been rebuttals to the article, and although it talks a lot about the demographics and use of the platform, I would actually challenge that the rise and fall of Twitter (or any other social network) might not be something that we would look at from the viewpoint of group, but more from a personal perspective.

Stay with me here…

Twitter, depending on the day, can be either the greatest thing, the most boring thing, the most overwhelming thing, or something I simply don’t pay attention to.  But is it really Twitter or my use of it?

It’s not you Twitter, it’s me.

From my perspective, Twitter shares two main purposes in my own use that are extremely valuable.  The first is the “social” aspect.  I can go on there and see familiar faces, talk about happenings in the world, sporting events, or just joke around.  Some of my best friends that I have met started simply as profile pictures and a 140 character bio.  Avatars to friends.

The other aspect is the “learning” component.  I would say that since I started using Twitter to connect with educators and see not only what was happening in other schools, but to also get ideas and perspectives about education as a whole.  I have learned a lot about education systems in other countries around the world when five years ago, I might not have had that perspective.  The ability to talk to people, and not just “look up stuff”, has made this network invaluable to the work that I do in my own practice.

Social + Learning = Engagement (for me)

From what I have seen, people that use it for simply one or the other, and not both (in the education field), don’t stick around too long.  Our minds can get full and I do not need to continuously learn every second of the day, and the social aspect is something that many people can get from the connections that already exist in their world.  After a full week, the last thing I want to do sometimes is read an article on education related.  My mind is full and I want to decompress.  When I am watching a game with friends, I don’t need to tweet about it because I would rather enjoy the experience with the people in the room.  Yet, when I am by myself, the connection to others through social media makes the game that much more interesting.

So what does this mean?

Well, Twitter has already seen it’s demise in the eyes of individuals.  If the user experience is not being met, why stay on the network?  And that experience is not necessarily defined by the usability of the social network (although I am not a fan of the new profile), but in the way individuals use it.  There are people that I used to always connect with on Twitter that don’t share much on the network anymore.  Is it because Twitter has become meaningless to them, or something else in their life has grabbed more attention?  When I looked at my own use of Twitter through the archives, I could see a decrease or increase in tweets and I could directly correlate that with events happening in my life.

It’s not you Twitter, it’s me.

The thing that I do love about Twitter, is that the experience is personal and although some are predicting it’s demise, if it works for you, that’s what matters.   I know that when I have those times in my life where I want to take a break from that large network, it’s okay, because it’s going to be there when I am ready to come back, along with many of the people I have met, and the people I am looking forward to meet in the future.  The learning aspect of Twitter has been tremendous in my development, but the social aspect, the people that I have met and don’t want to lose that continuous connection with, that’s why I continuously come back.

If no one is looking at your Twitter account, it could be for a couple of reasons.

Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 12.26.00 PMMost organizations or schools feel that jumping on the social media bandwagon is something that they should do because it is becoming the norm for others.  If you think that Twitter is just about tweeting, you are missing a huge cultural shift that is happening.

Too many people use Twitter as a “one-way” communication.  They simply use it to deliver messages with no engagement at all.  This might work if you are a huge celebrity, otherwise you are spending time doing something that is really going to do nothing but take up your time.  If you are just sending information out, with no interaction, you are becoming the new “spam”.

Communication is key with organizations, but the huge cultural shift is that people do not want to just hear, they also want to be heard.  You might have a lot of followers on your account, but that does not mean people are engaged in what you are doing.

For example, @AirCanada used to be a horrible Twitter account.  It was used to share deals and tell about how awesome they were.  If anything, their presence and lack of true communication did more harm than good.  People wonder why would organization be in a space that is about back-and-forth communication, but only talk, and not listen?  Now, the account is doing an amazing job to connect with customers when they have concerns or problems.  I would never use email with Air Canada as I know their Twitter account is much more effective and faster.  They have to be, because the whole world can see their reaction (or lack thereof).

What is also important is heart.  Creating an emotional connection through a social media account is an art form and the Edmonton Humane Society does this beautifully.  It is not that hard to make people feel something when you are sharing puppies, but not everyone understands how to do it.  They share amazing stuff on their Facebook page, and often connect with people sharing it.  They have taken an organization and made it “human”.

To sum it up, if you want people to not just “follow” your school or business, you can’t just share.  You need to listen and engage, while also connecting and tapping into the humanness of people.

It is not just about “tweeting”.  There is a major shift that has happened in our world because of these different ways we can communicate.  Are you really paying attention?

The Selfishness of Kindness

I have written a lot about it this year, but losing my dad has forever changed me.  It has been nine months since I lost him and going home over Christmas and him not being there was weird.  I miss his stories that he used to tell, that seemed to make no sense, and were so bad that they were good.  He is an awesome man.

Struggling to deal with this and feeling in a very dark place, I tried a little experiment, and it all started on October 7th with a tweet.

 

Since that day, I have woke up almost every morning (with a couple of exceptions), and tweeted about someone who has made an impact on me in some way, big or small.  It started with one of my best friends in the world, Michelle Baldwin:

What I had hoped is that by starting every day with saying something positive about someone else, and sharing it with the world, I would feel better myself.  To be honest…it has helped more than I have ever thought it would.

I think that “Follow Friday” is a nice idea and it has been a mainstay on Twitter for a long time, but I guess I decided that I need to try to do that every day in a little way and in a meaningful way.  To me, it goes beyond, “this person is great to follow on Twitter”, to “this person is great and I was blessed enough to meet them.”

Would I love for this idea to spread?  Of course.  Not because it would ever bring me attention, but because doing something good, even as small as tweeting once a day about someone who has made an impact on me, can make someone else and myself feel good, even it is for a moment.

I plan to continue this project until I run out of people that have made an impact on me.  Consider it to be indefinite.

Take some time to check out the #365greattweeps hashtag and follow some of these awesome people.  I am lucky to have met all of them in person.

“Connected Educator” or “Educator that Connects”? #CE13

I had a great experience at #Edscape in New Jersey (thank you Eric Sheninger and school for being such great hosts!) and as a speaker and participant, it was great to learn from so many people that I knew already, and met for the first time.  Honestly, what has really changed about conferences for me is that I never feel that I am alone because I already know people when I walk into a building because of my use of social media. That being said, I really love connecting with people for the first time and hearing what they are trying and where they are at in their teaching careers.  I love meeting new people and I really believe in the Bill Nye idea:

nye

 

One of the discussions that really resonated was the idea of having more “connected educators.”  I found it to be really interesting as, obviously, there is real power in connecting as an educator through the use of social media. But, to be honest, educators connected way before that in other ways.

Social media obviously provides something pretty powerful though.  I have a tremendous belief in technology, and have stated clearly that I believe that isolation is a choice that educators now make. This being said, there is something about the term “connected educator” that just irks me.

Here is my rationale…

You hear often that we shouldn’t really use “digital citizenship,” but use “citizenship,” and that “digital literacy” is just “literacy.” So, when we say “connected educator,” I wonder why we don’t just say “educator?”  Now, people still use “digital” when describing those other aspects because they feel (as I do) that those things need to be explicit for people to embrace them.  But one difference is that those are “things” that we are describing–educators are people.  That changes my mindset immediately.

As I sat and listened to one educator defend that it should be extremely explicit that we need to push people to become “connected educators,” I sat in the audience with a young teacher that felt so embarrassed that she was not where others were at.  Immediately, you could see that she felt a huge divide and almost felt that there was an “elitist” attitude in being “connected.”  In no way was the speaker doing that, but language matters and when I say I am “this” and you are “that,” a divide is created.

My belief?  Educators should connect.  It should be a part of what we all do.  That being said, I have also learned that there are many ways that people connect (I have no idea how to use Google+ the way that I know how to use Twitter), and that people are on different timelines in their learning.  That has to be respected.  As everything, this journey to get people “connected” should be differentiated, but it can be dangerous when we use it as an adjective as opposed to a verb.

Here is a question…do you think that if you are a “connected educator” that you are better off than someone else who isn’t?  If the answer is “yes,” then when you describe yourself as that very thing, it is creating a notion of elitism.  Instead of trying to describe an educator by what they do or don’t do, maybe we should look at each other’s strengths and build on that.

When we use the term “connected educator” are we sometimes alienating the people that we want so badly to connect in the first place?

Thoughts?

Leading Innovative Change Series: Embrace an Open Culture

I wanted to try my hand at writing a series of blog posts on “Leading Innovative Change.” As I am looking at writing a book on the same topic, I thought I would put some ideas out there and hopefully learn from others on these topics. I also want to give these ideas away for free. These posts are for anyone in education, but are mostly focused on school administrators. In all of these, the idea that administrators openly model their learning will only accelerate a culture of innovation and risk-taking.  This is the final post in this series, but you can read the first four posts in the series:

1. Learning First, Technology Second
2. A New Staff Experience
3. Excellence Lies Within
4. Narrow Your Focus


cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by Alec Couros

Within the previous posts in this series, Embracing an open culture is vital to the success of them all.  Think of this process–one we often do in different areas of school: we have a coordinator or leader in some specific area that works one-on-one with individual teachers and they see things that others don’t.  

If your job is to create a culture that embraces any type of learning, how much impact does it have when we only see one person at a time and share it with no one?  Sitting down and taking the time to write a blog, tweet some ideas, or use any other online community is not only beneficial in the reflection process, but also brings ideas to a larger community.

Sharing is also vital in creating connections.  If you see something amazing with one teacher, and see potential for growth in another teacher, instead of being the sole bearer of knowledge and skill, why not look at ways of connecting the two?

Creating a “Spike”

If you wanted to work in the film industry, where would you most likely go?  If you wanted to be a country singer, what places are the most likely to give you opportunity?  If your answers were “Hollywood” and “Nashville,” respectively, you just identified what Richard Florida calls “spikes.”

A “spike” is a place where there is a large amount of people with one main area of interest that come together to create some of the best work in their field.  It is not the only place, but these specific areas are usually known for excellence.  So if I asked you where the “spike” is for educators, where would that be?  Well, because most places on Earth have a school, if we think of a “spike” being in a physical place, it would be hard to identify where that one place would be.  This is where social media comes in.  Passionate educators are using things like Twitter and hashtags, such as #edchat to come together, ask questions, share ideas and create innovative ideas.

“It isn’t how much you know that matters. What matters is how much access you have to what other people know. It isn’t just how intelligent your team members are; it is how much of that intelligence you can draw out and put to use.” Wiseman, McKeown from Multipliers

Many schools are creating “mini-spikes” of innovation where geography is not a factor, and sharing and learning can happen 24/7.  Parkland School Division, a school district that is spread over a large geographic area spanning over 100 miles, uses the hashtag #psd70 to connect educators, students, parents, community, as well as to invite in educators from around the world to share their learning.  This is a huge opportunity for a school district that has a school with less than 50 students, as well as places that are far from a major city.

Surrey School District in British Columbia has also done something similar by using the hashtag #sd36learn.  As one of the largest districts in the province, it is dispelling the myth that large usually equals a lack of innovation.  By creating a place, as Stephen Johnson says, where “hunches” can come together, they are more likely to bring new and better ideas to the forefront.

“When the world is flat, you can innovate without having to emigrate.” Thomas Friedman

A Flat Organization

When these spikes are created, leaders have to be comfortable that great ideas can come from anyone, anywhere and at any time.  The focus for leadership should not be on their ideas, but the best ideas.  This process also often creates strong influencers, that may not have any formal leadership position, yet have tremendous pull with others through their sharing of ideas.  Jamie Notter and Maddie Grant identify these people and their impact in the business world:

“Social media has created influencers among people traditionally outside an organization’s database of members or donors or customers. These are people whose activities and opinions can have tangible, measurable financial effects (good or bad); people on the periphery but who have social capital (i.e., trust) among their own networks.” Notter and Grant

In education, the focus has to move from distinct roles, to the idea that everyone can be both a teacher and a learner.  Organizations, as a whole, should model what they expect from students on a micro level; that they are willing to learn and grow.  With a focus on sharing on a mass scale, ideas often come to the forefront, and not necessarily people (although people that either have or share the best ideas will stick out).  As we tell our students the day they walk into kindergarten, “You need to share,”  this should also be the focus for organizations that are looking to move forward and create innovation.

Sharing should then not be the exception, but the default.

The Outsider View

Many large organizations have the belief that leadership should always be developed within–which it should be to an extent–but there has to be a balance of bringing in an outside view.  When you have people that have been trained within a system, by the system, you are more likely to repeat the same patterns that have always existed.  As Jamie Notter and Maddie Grant share, “Innovation has an inherent distaste for best practices because it is about new solutions, not copying existing solutions.”  

By opening what you do to outsiders, what people within an organization know as “best practic,” often can show opportunities for growth in the way we do our work. This is often why so many leaders are afraid of this very thing.  In that case, the ego of leadership seems to be more important than doing what is best for kids.  If your practices are amazing, sharing them with other educators gives them the opportunity to help more kids. If practices are weak, it often brings in new ideas to help your kids.  There is no loss in this situation for students, yet ego sometimes (often) gets in the way.

Opportunities like the “School Admin Virtual Mentor Program” which brings mentorship to current and future administrators, gives the much needed outsider view to what we do in our organization (for free).  If we want thinking outside of the box, we have to look outside of it by tapping into what social media can deliver.  We often bring out the innovators within our organization, while also bringing innovators into our work.  To create innovative practice within schools, we must go past an inward-only focus.

Many great ideas are out there.  We just need to find them, and more importantly, get  people connected to them.

“We can think more creatively if we open our minds to the many connected environments that make creativity possible.” Stephen Johnson

Forward

These solutions may be fairly new to education, but other organizations have tapped into this opportunity.  The entertainment industry, for example, which was staunchly against the notion of open and free sharing, sees the opportunity of tapping into passionate people to create something better.  

Instead of paying a ton of money to one person to create a new theme for Hockey Night in Canada, the Canadian Broadcasting Corportation (CBC) decided they would “crowdsource” the opportunity, and give people that are passionate about music the ability to participate in creating something powerful.  The focus is on creating the “best,” and with the myriad of options that this process (crowdsourcing) would create, you are more likely to find that.

Social media, and the open culture it has created, has made our culture and mindset “participatory.”

“One of the reasons social media has grown so fast is that it taps into what we, as human beings, naturally love and need and want to do—create, share, connect, relate.” Notter and Grant

If our culture is shifting to this, wouldn’t this become the expected norm that many new educators (and current students) would expect to live within our schools?  While we live in a world where people are used to creating, sharing and connecting, schools can no longer ignore this cultural shift. They must embrace the idea that we are lucky to live in a time of such technological advance and openness that will make the opportunity to be innovative that much easier.

The Twitter Story

In less than 140 characters, there is a funny little story that is topical and pointing out some of the funny characteristics of Canadians (very polite and that we are big fans of rapper Jay-Zed).

So why are we so hard on kids that they “overshare” on social networks?  Much of what they do would be considered a short “story” that they are often telling in 140 characters or less to an audience.  Stories have been, and always will be, an important part of our world.

There have been great societies that did not use the wheel, but there have been no societies that did not tell stories. —Ursula K. LeGuin

The mediums to tell these stories have not changed; they have expanded.

In the recent article, “Twitter is the New Haiku”, the author shares Twitter CEO Dick Costolo’s belief in the artistry that can come from a simple tweet:

“Sometimes I get asked, ‘Don’t you feel that the 140 characters has meant that people don’t think about things deeply anymore?’ The reality is that you don’t look at haiku and say, ‘You know, aren’t you worried that this format is going to prevent people from thinking deeply when you can only use this many words and it has to be set this way?’ I think that people develop language for creatively communicating within whichever constraints you set for people.” Dick Costolo

The author then continues to discuss that with this type of communication, less can often mean more:

“The power of communicating in fewer words is that those words mean more, and in their best forms, those words can inspire thousands more in discussion and speculation.” Emma Green

So are all tweets powerful stories?  Absolutely not.  A lot of what is shared is absolutely terrible, and many would say that Twitter is really harming our use of language.  Yet more people are moving to Twitter to share short stories that often turn into something more:

More recently, Twitter, too, has been coopted as a tool for fiction. Last year, Jennifer Egan wrote a short story in 140-character nuggets, which were posted on Twitter before they were published in The New Yorker as “Black Box.” A few months later, novelist Elliott Holt wrote her own Slate opined. “With its simultaneous narrators and fractured storyline, this is not the kind of tale that could march steadily across a continuous expanse of white space. It’s actually made for the medium.”

The major difference with something like Twitter is that it immediately can give our students an audience.  Looking at the traditional time it takes to publish a book, it can almost take a year from the moment it is finished until it is ready for an audience.  I am not saying that it is not a worthy endeavour to try writing a book, but we live in a world with multiple opportunities to try different mediums.  We do not have to focus on one.

Almost 700 posts into this blog, I first found my voice through Twitter, which expanded into a blog, and may now expand into a book next year.  By learning to use the first medium. it helped build my confidence in expanding to the next.  The ability to share short little messages and stories, has helped me to move to actually expanding my thoughts.  Wouldn’t starting with the 140 character story be a good start for our students?


cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Wesley Nitsckie