11 Comments

  1. Faige Meller

    How often I’ve been asked a similar question and comment as “Why don’t you take it easy, you’ve earned it!” I have and that’s why I don’t. It’s my journey that I take with joy and pride. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and reflections.

  2. Adrianna Brumbaugh

    I.cannot.believe.this.blog.

    Tears. Someone else is just like me. Thank you for writing this. It made me exhale.

  3. I have subscribed to your blog for a long time and recently got to hear you speak twice in one day at Teacher’s Convention. I have always enjoyed your blog as I connect with what you share in a way that I don’t always get with colleagues. As I meet with resistance and sometimes feel alone because I’m trying to facilitate change, it is often your posts that give me the lift I need to know I’m not the only one who thinks this way. When I heard you at Convention it was as if you were speaking to my heart. I was excited to share your words with colleagues and re-energized. This particular post was like reading about myself. I get cautioned all the time to slow down, work less and take time to enjoy life and it usually makes me feel guilty and I sometimes wonder if I should be doing less or doing things differently so I can be more “efficient” with my time. The reality is I haven’t changed in 2 decades as I absolutely love what I do. I became an administrator because I wanted to make a bigger difference in kids’ lives — beyond a single classroom. My days are dedicated to people; kids, staff and parents and I have to do emails, paperwork etc after that. Sometimes I don’t get to start these other tasks until 5:00 or later. This is when the comments start … “You should go home” “Don’t work too late” “You need to take care of yourself”. These can come from staff who are headed out the door, the custodian and yes sometimes still my own parents. Reading your post today was once again just what I needed! Thanks for sharing your thoughts and your learning with all of us. It is much appreciated and although I don’t often make time to comment or respond, you need to know that what you say makes a difference. Have a fabulous day!

  4. Trisha Detert

    Thank you for writing this, I often feel guilty about the amount of time I spend “working”. I don’t feel as if it is working because it is a part of me, who I am and I enjoy every aspect of my life as an elementary principal.

  5. Kym MG

    I hadn’t seen that quote by Mark Twain… “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”  I still remember the day I realized that teaching is what I was meant to do. It’s not always easy and doesn’t always make me happy (I teach MIDDLE SCHOOL!), but I know it is an important job and I am thankful that I found my calling early.

  6. Thank you for compiling such an interesting collection of resources around this topic. While I agree that purpose and meaning drive the most impactful work, and while I LOVE what I get the privilege to do every day, I do find value in a more balanced life. My lack of balance during years I was focused solely on a stressful and rewarding job led to significant health problems. Years late I can see the value in taking time away from the work I love, to do the other things I love (spending time with friends and family, reading fiction for pleasure, writing, and other hobbies). This makes me stronger and more prepared to be the leader others need me to be while I am with them. Thanks for making me think.

  7. Interesting perspective. While I don’t necessarily agree in full I do appreciate everyone approaches life differently and in many cases, there isn’t a single right path.

    As much as I wouldnt or shouldn’t judge people for working too hard, I don’t think it’s fair to judge people who do take time to enjoy life, go to the beach and drink in the beauty of the world.

    The book I’m reading called Rest, challenges the idea that work and rest are separate things. The ability to be more productive and better because of taking breaks, working less is a valid perspective too.

    You need to do what works for you and your family. You do great work.

    As someone who travels I consider my learning embedded into seeing new things and new people and at times being selfish and taking time for myself.

    Not likely a single path but this is a useful discussions. Your blog is nice.

  8. Heidi Hutchison

    Thank you for sharing so much of yourself. I have gotten much pushback for working so much but I have always said, “It really doesn’t feel like work.” I find so much joy in learning more and finding ways to serve others by sharing our learning together. Yesterday I shared Angela Maier’s “You Matter” video (https://youtu.be/0RtAetJHEFE ) with all employees of my school. She says, and I am paraphrasing ‘The world needs you. We need your gifts and talents. You matter!’ Thank you, George Couros, “You matter!”

  9. Christina Carter

    I am so lucky to love my “work” – its just a part of who I am. I find it more difficult to do nothing – even on days of rest away from deadlines, I still find myself keeping busy doing things for other people. I enjoyed the different quotes in this article and I look forward to the Grant Cardone book as well!

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