15 Comments

  1. Robert Schuetz

    Totally on board with this George! Terrific perspective and inspiring quotes.
    Personal (notice I didn’t say personalized / @WillRich45) learning needs to be experienced and embraced by educators in order to support students that are embarking on an individually responsible learning (IRL) journey. Chapter two looks like a slam dunk to me! Forge on!

  2. Neil

    The paradox of “21st Century” school boards. How do you implement change in the classroom without telling teachers exactly how to make that change? As soon as a Director, Superintendent, Resource Specialist, I.T. person, Principal, or Keynote Speaker begins telling teachers what they should be doing in the class, or what tools they should be using, it’s game over.

    Just as students must stop looking at the teacher for the “answers”, teachers need to stop thinking that their “answers” can be found anywhere but inside themselves. I don’t mean that teachers can’t use the “higher ups” as resources, but only in ways that make sense to the teacher. And for money.

    At the same time, unless someone is exposed to a new idea, such as 21st Century Classrooms, they may never realize they actually have anything new to learn. But, honestly, if there is a teacher out there that needs some authority figure to tell them to learn more about education, I doubt if that teacher will be able to make any meaningful change in their teaching practice, anyways.

  3. lwelch616

    One thing I have been thinking about lately is 20% time and how we can use that in professional development. I think it is fascinating for students and the intrinsic motivation (as discussed by Daniel Pink) it encourages. I would hope that teachers would also feel that sense of intrinsic motivation to learn about something in relationship to their work that they were passionate about.

  4. Catherine Smith

    I agree that adminstrators must model the behaviours with their staff that they want staff to use with their classes. Diversity in staff makes for a stronger staff – if we are prepared to learn from each other. Leaders in schools must show their willingness to learn but also be prepared to show their vulnerability and acknowldege that they can learn from staff.

  5. […] 3.  New teachers are innovative and experienced teachers are holding onto the past.  This statement, for me, couldn’t be further from the truth.  First of all, some of the biggest resistors to changing the classroom environment in schools are often new teachers. This really surprised me at first but then I heard Bruce Dixon speak and he said something that resonated.  He said, “In no other profession do you watch someone do your jobs for 16 years before you do it yourself.” Wow.  It is easy to understand how our experience for learning in school really shapes the way we teach and that is why I am big advocate in creating a new experience in the way that we do professional learning. […]

  6. […] I just wonder how many hits that video (over 130,000 at the time I am sharing it on this blog) would have received if it was a classroom full of students doing the same thing? Would people have cared as much? They should. I also wonder if someone in that session will use the same techniques with their own students? Often we teach the way we were taught and if we do not change the experiences teachers have in their own professional development, we can&#821… […]

  7. […] I just wonder how many hits that video (over 130,000 at the time I am sharing it on this blog) would have received if it was a classroom full of students doing the same thing? Would people have cared as much? They should. I also wonder if someone in that session will use the same techniques with their own students? Often we teach the way we were taught and if we do not change the experiences teachers have in their own professional development, we can’t … […]

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