18 Comments

  1. That's really cool. What this reinforces (and it is evident over and over) is the willingness of people to connect with other people they have never even met. It reinforces that modeling for students the power of being connected and teaching them how to safely and purposefully connect with others is a skill we cannot pass off any longer.

    I showed a group of teachers the Steven Johnson RSAnimate video today, and it really is true, chance does favor the connected mind.

    Cool post.

  2. Wow….this type of amazing stuff is happening all the time and I'm so glad you share it with the world. Now I know I need to get back to twitter, to my blog and get my students out there with me!

  3. […] George Couros, author of a piece titled “Authentic Audience,” believes teachers can help provide their students with this elusive audience by tweeting their work for the world. One of his students received feedback on her writing from the author her class had been studying. What a powerful motivation tool and how affirming that response must have been for this student! So this week, I tweeted links to a list of student blogs, but who am I really reaching when I only have 46 followers? […]

  4. […] To be honest, not every student will take to blogging the way that we envision as teachers, and to be honest, that is okay.  If we make them do it the way we think it should be done, they might have trouble adopting this past the school setting.  That being said, if we do give them the freedom to write or share not only what they are interested in, but also share it how they like, it could develop into something very powerful that will also give them an authentic audience. […]

  5. […] To be honest, not every student will take to blogging the way that we envision as teachers, and to be honest, that is okay.  If we make them do it the way we think it should be done, they might have trouble adopting this past the school setting.  That being said, if we do give them the freedom to write or share not only what they are interested in, but also share it how they like, it could develop into something very powerful that will also give them an authentic audience. […]

  6. […] To be honest, not every student will take to blogging the way that we envision as teachers, and to be honest, that is okay.  If we make them do it the way we think it should be done, they might have trouble adopting this past the school setting.  That being said, if we do give them the freedom to write or share not only what they are interested in, but also share it how they like, it could develop into something very powerful that will also give them an authentic audience. […]

  7. Hi George-

    This is just fantastic. It perfectly exemplifies in ‘real life’ what I am trying to help my teachers understand. I just shared it with them and I am so hopeful it will spark some different thinking from them. I truly believe one of the huge, untapped ‘positives’ of the internet is the possibilities of “connectedness” that is so important for kids (and adults!) to recognize, and that your account so excellently illuminates. THANKS!!!

    Gene

  8. This year my students have been fortunate enough to make some connections with authentic audiences. I’ve found with the use of social media (Twitter in particular) that people are willing to connect with people they’ve never met before. In preparation for our version of #geniushour we were able to skype with the VP of Marketing for HaikuDeck and one of the creators of the DuckDUckMoose apps. The students had an authentic audience for their questions. They listened to the suggestions we gave. It was an amazing experience.

  9. […] To be honest, not every student will take to blogging the way that we envision as teachers, and to be honest, that is okay.  If we make them do it the way we think it should be done, they might have trouble adopting this past the school setting.  That being said, if we do give them the freedom to write or share not only what they are interested in, but also share it how they like, it could develop into something very powerful that will also give them an authentic audience. […]

  10. […] Of course, as Couros notes, “to be honest, not every student will take to blogging the way that we envision as teachers, and to be honest, that is okay. If we make them do it the way we think it should be done, they might have trouble adopting this past the school setting. That being said, if we do give them the freedom to write or share not only what they are interested in, but also share it how they like, it could develop into something very powerful that will also give them an authentic audience.” […]

  11. […] When one of our students blogged about a booked named “The Dot”, she was surprised that approximately five hours after it was posted, the author commented back to her.  This impact from one person and the connection facilitated brings a different type of motivation to students that was non-existent when I went to school.  As Steven Johnson states, “Chance favours the connected mind”, and we need to take advantage of this new opportunity that is afforded to both ourselves and our students.  Someone once told me that after years of school, when students hand in assignments to their teacher, they just want it to be “good enough” but when they are writing for an authentic audience, they want it to be “good”. […]

  12. […] When one of our students blogged about a booked named “The Dot”, she was surprised that approximately five hours after it was posted, the author commented back to her.  This impact from one person and the connection facilitated brings a different type of motivation to students that was non-existent when I went to school.  As Steven Johnson states, “Chance favours the connected mind”, and we need to take advantage of this new opportunity that is afforded to both ourselves and our students.  Someone once told me that after years of school, when students hand in assignments to their teacher, they just want it to be “good enough” but when they are writing for an authentic audience, they want it to be “good”. […]

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